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Fort Huachuca - Fort Huachuca Museum

41401 Grierson Avenue
520-533-4946

Fort Huachuca, an army base at the mouth of Huachuca Canyon just west of Sierra Vista, was established in 1877. The buildings of the old post have been declared a National Historic Landmark, and one is now a museum dedicated to the many forts that dotted the Southwest in the latter part of the 19th century. Interesting aspects of the exhibits include quotes by soldiers that give an idea of what it was like to serve back then. The associated U.S. Army Intelligence Museum, at Hungerford and Christy streets, has displays on early code machines, surveillance drones, and other pieces of equipment formerly used for intelligence gathering

History:

Fort Huachuca is a product of the Indian Wars of the 1870s and 1880s. In February 1877, Colonel August B. Kautz, commander of the Department of Arizona, ordered that a camp be established in the Huachuca Mountains. This camp would offer protection to settlers and travel routes in southeastern Arizona while simultaneously blocking the traditional Apache escape routes through the San Pedro and Santa Cruz valleys to sanctuary in Mexico. A temporary camp was established at the post’s current location on March 3, 1877, by Captain Samuel Marmaduke Whitside with two companies of the 6th Cavalry. The site was selected because it had fresh running water, an abundance of trees, excellent observation in three directions, and protective high ground for security against Apache tactical methods. Camp Huachuca was redesignated a fort in 1882.


In 1886, General Nelson A. Miles designated Fort Huachuca as his advance headquarters and forward supply base for the Geronimo campaign. Geronimo’s surrender in August 1886 practically ended the Apache danger in southern Arizona. The Army closed more than 50 camps and forts in the territory, but Fort Huachuca was retained because of continuing border troubles involving renegade Indians, Mexican bandits, and American outlaws and freebooters. In 1913, the 10th Cavalry “Buffalo Soldiers” arrived and remained almost 20 years. The 10th Cavalry joined General John J. Pershing in the 1916 expedition into Mexico and, during World War I, it was assigned the mission of guarding the United-States-Mexico border.


By 1933, the 25th Infantry Regiment had replaced the 10th Cavalry as the main combat unit for the fort. The 25th, in turn, was absorbed by the 93rd Infantry Division during World War II. When the 93rd departed for the Pacific in 1943, the 92nd Infantry Division arrived at the fort for training and subsequent assignment to the European Theater. During the war years, the troop strength reached 30,000 men at the fort, which in the 1930s had been described as suitable for a brigade-sized unit of about 10,000 men.


At war’s end, the fort was declared surplus and transferred to the State of Arizona. It was reactivated during the Korean War by the Army Engineers. A new era began in 1954 when control passed to the Chief Signal Officer, who found the area and climate ideal for testing electronic and communications equipment. The importance of the fort in the national defense picture grew steadily from that moment. In 1967, Fort Huachuca became the headquarters of the U.S. Army Strategic Communications Command. Then, in 1971, the post became the home of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School, bringing with it the School Brigade. 


The Strategic Communications Command became the U.S. Army Communications Command in 1973, subsequently changing to the U.S. Army Information Systems Command in 1984.
In October 1990, the post changed hands with the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command became the new host command; the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and Fort Huachuca now operates the post.Today, Fort Huachuca is the major military installation in Arizona, and one of prominence throughout the Southwest



Reviews

Carla Cook

Rating:
Thursday, March 22, 2018
If you are in the area, make sure to visit this museum in Fort Huachuca. You must get a pass by entering at the Van De Mann gate. The history of Buffalo Soldiers can be found here. Many of the original barracks and other buildings are still in use. A visit to the cemetery is also recommended. Be sure to go to the Buffalo Corral to sign up for a guided sunset horseback ride!!!

Scott Renegade Lebeir

Rating:
Thursday, March 29, 2018
Great military museum with a pretty good history of the Buffalo Soldier that served St the post during the Mexican American war and WWI.

David Mulhorn

Rating:
Wednesday, April 11, 2018
I use to live is Serria Vista when I was a kid, my Dad worked at Fort Huachuca. My wife and finally got to visit my old stomping grounds got to see the museum and it was well worth the time.

Kerry Fry

Rating:
Friday, Sep. 29, 2017
Fantastic park, loved the beautiful gardens, a big thumbs up to the local Gardener's. The campground is very nice, the cave tour was very well done and informational, great activity center. Really were pleasantly surprised buy all there is to enjoy here. Will keep this on the come back list.

Michael Larmore

Rating:
Friday, March 30, 2018
A very good Museum to visit find out about the past of the fork also the now day of the fort

Fort Huachuca Museum is not affiliated with AmericanTowns Media